Headlines from World Sources

Obama on a “world without nuclear weapons”

http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/26/world/asia/korea-obama-visit/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17507976

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/26/world/asia/president-obama-visits-south-korea.html?scp=4&sq=nuclear%20summit&st=cse

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/asia-pacific/2012/03/201232621827972261.html

Shooter in Toulouse killed and brother captured

http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/25/world/europe/france-shooting/index.html?hpt=hp_t3

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/europe/2012/03/2012325222737387945.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-17503396

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/26/world/europe/french-officials-want-to-investigate-gunmans-brother.html?ref=world

Killing of Trayvon Martin

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/americas/2012/03/201232423250839192.html

http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/25/justice/florida-teen-shooting/index.html?hpt=us_c1

Alexandria: Aphrodite Foxtrot

 

Lust. Wrath. Envy. Greed. Vanity. These five sins are fundamental elements to creating a tragedy on the Greek level. This exotic foxtrot comes from the play Aphrodite: A Romance of Ancient Egypt which tells an erotic tale of a tumultuous love affair between a sculptor and a courtesan. The play was based on the erotic French novel Aphrodite – Ancient Manners by Pierre Louys. It was published in 1896, the play debuted in 1919, but the novel did not reach America until 1925. How did they produce the play without the book? In Paris in 1914, there was a play called Aphrodite, and it was also based on Louys’ book. In attendance were American playwrights who decided to adapt and present it

“Pierre Louys.” Wikipedia. 17 Mar. 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Lou%C3%BFs&gt;.

Frondaie, Pierre & Gest, Morris. “Aphrodite.” Google Books. 17 Mar. 2012. <http://books.google.com/books?id=3vULAQAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false&gt;.

“Aphrodite (Ancient Manners).” Mynotera.com. 18 Mar. 2012. <http://www.mynotera.com/152385,auction_id,auction_details&gt;.

“Pierre Frondaie.” Wikipedia. 19 Mar. 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Frondaie&gt;.

Cylinder Sound Beat Reflection

 

Alexandria: Aphrodite fox trot possible versions

Version #1

“Alexandria: Aphrodite fox trot” is a song composed by Bohemian born Dr. Anselm Goetzl. It comes from the play Aphrodite: A Romance of Ancient Egypt. The play is based on the book Aphrodite – Ancient Manners by Pierre Louys. It was his first novel and it was published in France in 1896. The novel was immediately met with extreme success. It is about a sculptor who falls in love with a courtesan. Louys was known for his erotic homosexual themes and fascination with classical times. Due to the nature of the book, it did not reach America until 1925 when it was published privately. However not long after in 1929, it was banned until the mid-50s as the government deemed it as corrupting and obscene.

Version #2

“Alexandria: Aphrodite fox trot” is a song composed by Bohemian born composter, conductor, and producer Dr. Anselm Goetzl. It is from the play Aphrodite: A Romance of Ancient Egypt which is based on the book Aphrodite – Ancient Manners by French author Pierre Louys. It was published in France in 1896 and was immediately a bestseller. This erotic novel about love, passion, and crime unfolds like a Greek tragedy. It takes place in classical times in Ancient Alexandria during the Ptolemaic dynasty. The protagonist, Demetrios is a sculptor and is the favorite lover of the Queen Berenice. However, he falls in love with a beautiful and seductive courtesan named Chrysis. She demands he prove his love by committing three crimes in which he agrees.

Alexandria: Aphrodite fox trot (re-done)

The version of Alexandria: Aphrodite fox trot found in the Belfer Cylinder Archive in Syracuse University was recorded by the Della Robbia Orchestra. However, the original was recorded by Joseph C. Smith’s Orchestra in New York. This song is from the play Aphrodite: A Romance of Ancient Egypt. It is composed by Dr. Anselm Goetzl, a Bohemian-born composer, conductor, and producer. The play was based on the bestselling novel Aphrodite- Ancient Manners – a modern Greek tragedy by Pierre Louys, and was adapted by Pierre Frondaie and George C. Hazelton.

The book explores the sensual world of courtesans set in ancient Alexandria during the Ptolemaic dynasty. The protagonist, Demetrios, a sculptor of the court and the lover of Queen Berenice, falls in love with the powerful and seductive courtesan Chrysis during a festival dedicated to the goddess Aphrodite. Chrysis asks Demetrios to commit three crimes for her to prove his love and to gain her favor. Aphrodite was published in 1896 and was well received and extremely popular in France but due to its nature, it did not reach other audiences till the turn of the century. American playwrights attended the original production in Paris in 1914, they liked it and bought the rights and brought the idea back to America. Of course changes had to be made to accommodate to the American audience. The play debuted at the Century Theater in New York City and it had a successful run from November 1919 to April 1920.